Individual Notes

Note for:   Henry II King of England,   5 MAR 1132/33 - 6 JUL 1189         Index

Individual Note:
     First Plantaganet King of England (1154-1189), known as "Curt Mantel", was born at Le Mans, France, on March 15, 1133. At eighteen in 1151 he was invested with the Duchy of Normandy, his mother's heritage, and within a year became also, by his father's death, Count of Anjou; while in 1152 he married Eleanor of Aquitaine, the daughter of William X, Duke of Aquitaine, and divorced wife of King Louis VII. of France, added Poitou and Guienne to his dominions. In January 1153 he landed in England, and in November a treaty was agreed to whereby Henry was declared successor to King Stephen; he was crowned in 1154 and ruled until his death in 1189. He confirmed the laws of his grandfather, King Henry I, reestablished the exchequer, banished the foreign mercenaries, demolished the hundreds of castles erected in Stephen's reign, and recovered the royal estates. The whole of 1156 he spent in France, reducing his brother, Geoffrey of Nantes, who died in 1158, and having secured his territories, he spent the next five years warring and organizing his possessions on the Continent. Henry's objective was that of all Norman kings, to build up the royal power at the expense of the barons and the church. From the barons his reforms met with little serious opposition; with the clergy he was less successful.
To aid him in reducing the church to subjection, he appointed his chancellor, Thomas a Becket to the see of Canterbury. Henry compelled him and the other prelates to agree to the 'Constitution of Clarendon', but Becket proved a sturdy churchman, and the struggle between him and the monarch terminated only by his murder. In 1174 Henry did penance at Becket's tomb, but he ended by bringing the church to subordination in civil matters. Meanwhile he organized an expedition to Ireland. The English Pope, Adrian IV, had in 1155 given Henry authority over the entire island of Ireland; and a number of Norman-Welsh knights had gained a footing in the country, among them Richard de Clare,
Earl of Pembroke, styled Strongbow, who in 1155 married the heiress of Leinster and assumed rule as the Earl of Leinster. Henry was jealous at the rise of a powerful feudal baronage in Ireland, and during his stay there (1171-1172) he broke the power of Richard Strongbow and the other nobles.

Henry had a natural son, William Longsword (Longespee), who became Earl of Salisbury by marrying the Countess Ela, then aged twelve (1198). He was a councilor of John and commanded the English part of the army which Philip Augustus of France defeated at Bouvines (1214). He supported King John at Runnymede (1215), fought for Henry III. at Lincoln and Sandwich (1217), and served with Hubert de Burgh as "ruler of the King and kingdom" (1222). He died in March, 1226. In 1188, while Henry II. was engaged in a war with Philip of France, Richard joined the French King; and in 1189, Henry having lost Le Mans and the chief castles of Maine, agreed to a treaty of peace granting an indemnity to the followers of Richard. The sight of his favorite son John in the list broke his heart; and he died at Chinon, on July 6, 1189. On the whole, Henry was an able and enlightened sovereign, a clear-headed, unprincipled politician, and an able general; his reign was one of great legal reforms. At its height, Henry's power had been greater than that of any other European ruler and his position was comparable to that of such Holy Roman Emperors as Charlemagne and Frederick Barbarossa. Eleanor died in 1202. Henry was succeeded by his surviving son, John.

Buried in Fontevrault Abbey in Anjou.

"Henry II, founder of the Plantagenet dynasy, created a system of government in 1153 that was meant to bridge old differences with legal rationalism and halt new discord through monarchical continuity. In 1161, the King urged the pope, Alexander III, to canonize Edward [the Confessor: Innocent III had turned down an earlier such request in 1140]. We know his reasons from the petitions of the king and his counsellors. His lieutenants stressed that the disputes between the Anglo-Saxons and Normans, newly arisen under King Stephen, had to be permanently suppressed; to that end, it would be helpful if an old Anglo-Saxon ruler were advanced to the glories of sainthood by his Norman successor. The King himself went even further, claiming to be personally related to the Confessor: 'It was I, descendant of his blood, whom the Lord honoured and set upon the throne of the same kingdpm.' Henry II was the first king in Europe to trace his lineage back to a saintly ruler. "The fact that the blood relationship was far removed made no difference; it established the dynasty's propinquity to God, even opposing papal encroachments and the aristocratic right of dissent. Edward, who had propagated the good old laws, secured the legitimacy of the Plantagents' legislation. Though they had originally been foreigners, the royal family eventually took permanent residence near the tomb of the saint, an important step in consolidating their state. Henry's great-grandfather, William the Conquroer, had been crowned in Westminster Abbey, and by 1140, following the example of the French royal Abbey of St. Denis, the Abbey had already begun to proclaim its ambitions, taking advantage of the aid of falsified documents. Not until the canonization of King Edward, who was buried there, did Westminster really become the 'royal seat', the coronation and burial chapel of the English monarcy that it is today. The cult of Edward, however, never departed from its dynastic framework; it. left no traditions of the people.
"The news soon spread that the founder of a dynasty could legitimize his successors by canonizing an ancestor. ..... "
--- Arno Horst, *Medieval Worlds*, English translation by Eric Hanse,
1991, p 134-4 (Univ of Chicago Pr; original German, 1988)

Source: http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=michelotti&id=I014242

Individual Notes

Note for:   Myles Standish,    - ABT 1660         Index

Individual Note:
     Son of Myles Standish. Myles Standish, Jr. disappeared at sea circa. 1660
Source: http://www.robertsewell.ca/mayflower.html

Individual Notes

Note for:   Mary Chilton,   13 MAY 1607 - BEF 1 MAY 1679         Index

Individual Note:
     Mary's father died on December 18, 1620 and her mother died shortly after January 21, 1620/1. At age thirteen Mary Chilton was thus left an orphan at Plymouth. No record reveals with whom she spent the next few years but perhaps for at least a part of the time she was a member of either the Alden or the Standish household.

       Mary married at Plymouth sometime between July 1623 and May 22, 1627 to John Winslow, who had arrived at Plymouth in 1621 on the Fortune. John was born at Droitwich, Worcestershire on April 16, 1597; and died at Boston before May 21, 1674. John was a son of Edward and Magdalen (Ollyver) Winslow, and brother of Pilgrim Edward Winslow. Both John and Mary are buried in King’s Chapel Burying Grounds, Boston.

Source: Robert Sewell http://www.robertsewell.ca/mayflower.html

Individual Notes

Note for:   James Chilton,   ABT 1563 - 18 DEC 1620         Index

Individual Note:
     While a signer of the Mayflower Compact, Chilton died before reaching Plymouth.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Susanna Furner (?),   1564 -          Index

Individual Note:
     The name of James Chilton's wife is unknown. It has been suggested that she was Susanna Furner, daughter of his step-mother and her first husband Francis Furner. However, the identity of James' wife remains in doubt as Susanna Furner's baptism record indicates she was far too young (only 12) to be married and having children in 1586. To further confuse the issue, James is said to have married secondly to the widow Isabell Furner, who was not the mother of his children. Note that "Isabell Furner" was also the name of James' stepmother.

Source: Robert Sewell http://www.robertsewell.ca/mayflower.html

Individual Notes

Note for:   Frederick Dummer Sewall,   22 JAN 1826 - 16 DEC 1907         Index

Individual Note:
     See: http://www.sewellgenealogy.com/p29.htm#i989

Individual Notes

Note for:   Marcia Elizabeth S. Sewall,   1 JUL 1825 - 17 JUL 1863         Index

Individual Note:
     See: http://www.sewellgenealogy.com/p29.htm#i993

Individual Notes

Note for:   Frederic Norris Sewall,   OCT 1864 - 14 DEC 1908         Index

Individual Note:
     See: http://www.sewellgenealogy.com/p422.htm#i16161

Individual Notes

Note for:   Joseph Thompson Sewall,   7 NOV 1895 - 3 NOV 1976         Index

Individual Note:
     See: http://www.sewellgenealogy.com/p372.htm#i14312

Individual Notes

Note for:   Nance Sarah Elizabeth Sewall,   19 MAY 1914 - 31 JAN 1996         Index

Alias:   Nancy /Sewall/


Individual Notes

Note for:   James Sewall,   28 JUL 1766 - 13 FEB 1839         Index

Individual Note:
     Source: http://www.sewellgenealogy.com/p21.htm#i752

Individual Notes

Note for:   John Jenks Sewall,   3 OCT 1817 - 23 DEC 1868         Index

Individual Note:
     Source: http://www.sewellgenealogy.com/p337.htm#i13128

Individual Notes

Note for:   Arthur Sewall,   21 JUL 1886 -          Index

Individual Note:
     Mayor of Bath Maine.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Sumner Sewall,   17 JUN 1897 - 25 JAN 1965         Index

Individual Note:
     "Sumner Sewall, 67, pioneer aviator and Republican Governor of Maine from 1941 to 1945, a World War I ace (seven planes, two balloons) who teamed up with Juan Trippe in 1926 to fly the first New York to Boston airmail run, as Maine's Word War II Governor organized one of the country's first Civil Defence Corps. Later returned to aviation as President of American Overseas Airways, helped build it into a major transatlantic carrier before it merged with Trippe's Pan American in 1950." Time Magazine 5/2/1965

See: http://www.sewellgenealogy.com/p51.htm#i1698