Individual Notes

Note for:   Louisa May Alcott,   29 NOV 1832 - 6 MAR 1888         Index

Individual Note:
     (1832-1888), American writer, whose books for children are characterized
by their intimate depiction of family life and loyalties. The daughter of
the educator and philosopher Bronson Alcott, she was born in Germantown,
Pennsylvania. She was raised in Boston and was tutored by the American
writers Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. While serving as a
nurse during the American Civil War, Alcott wrote letters to her family
that were later published as Hospital Sketches (1863). Her most famous
works Little Women (1868-69), an autobiographical novel of her childhood,
and its sequels, Little Men (1871) and Jo's Boys (1886) are considered
classics. In order to support her own often poverty-stricken family,
Alcott also wrote a number of thrillers. These well-crafted, suspenseful
yarns were published pseudonymously in various magazines.


http://www.oldfashionedliving.com/alcott.html

http://www.aboutfamouspeople.com/article1004.html

http://www.louisamayalcott.org

Individual Notes

Note for:   Nathan Willis Sewall,   21 AUG 1854 - 10 JUN 1923         Index

Individual Note:
     Sewall Family Genealogy:
He went to Wilton as a young man and engaged in the carriage-making business. Later he conducted a hardware store. He was an unusually public-spirited citizen, a trustee of Wilton Academy and actively concerned with its affairs. He was an organizer of the Wilton Water Company and served as its treasurer and collector until his death. At that time the following tribute was sent to his family:

'The First Congregational Church of Wilton, Maine, at its annual meeting held January 22, 1924, voted to set aside a page in its records in memory of Deacon N. W. Sewall, and the following minute has been inscribed therein:

Nathan Willis Sewall became a member of this church in 1877. For forty-two years he served the church as deacon, and for more than twenty-one years he was a choir leader. He was superintendent and teacher in the Sunday School and frequently served on the Business Committee. For many years no important work of the church has been undertaken without his advice and help. He gave himself to his service with complete devotion, and performed it with excellent judgment and in a spirit of hearty cooperation. The results of his labor have been of untold value to the church.

Of even more significance than Mr. Sewall's work has been the influence of his devout and sincere Christian character. Upright and conscientious in his own life, charitable toward others, liberal in his thinking, strong in his convictions, possessed of deep spiritual insight, he represented to us a true type of Christian layman. His spirit and example ennobled and enriched the life of our church and community."

Individual Notes

Note for:   John Hancock,   12 JAN 1736/37 - 8 OCT 1793         Index

Individual Note:
     He was a student Cambridge, MA, 1754. School: Harvard College. Signer of the Declaration of Independence and Governor of Massachusetts.

http://www.colonialhall.com/hancock/hancock.asp

Individual Notes

Note for:   Edmund Quincy,   21 OCT 1681 - 23 FEB 1737/38         Index

Individual Note:
     Edmund's occupation: Justice Boston, MA. He was a student Cambridge, MA, 1699. School: Harvard College. He was created the 1st Earl of Gloucester.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Oliver Wendell Holmes,   29 AUG 1809 - 7 OCT 1894         Index

Burial:   
     Place:   Mount Auburn, MA

Individual Note:
     Oliver Wendell Holmes
    
American physician, poet, and humorist notable for his medical research and teaching, and as the author of the “Breakfast-Table” series of essay

Holmes read law at Harvard University before deciding on a medical career; and, following studies at Harvard and in Paris, he received his degree from Harvard in 1836. He practiced medicine for 10 years, taught anatomy for two years at Dartmouth College (Hanover, N.H.), and in 1847 became professor of anatomy and physiology at Harvard. He was later made dean of the Harvard Medical School, a post he held until 1882. His most important medical contribution was that of calling attention to the contagiousness of puerperal fever (1843).

Holmes achieved his greatest fame, however, as a humorist and poet. He wrote much poetry and comic verse during his early school years; he won national acclaim with the publication of "Old Ironsides" (1830), which aroused public sentiment against destruction of the USS Constitution, an American fighting ship from the War of 1812. Beginning in 1857, he contributed his “Breakfast-Table” papers to The Atlantic Monthly and subsequently published The Autocrat of the Break fast- Table (1858), The Professor of the Break fast- Table (1860), The Poet of the Breakfast Table (1872), and Over the Teacups (1891), written in conversational style and displaying Holmes's learning and wit.

Among his other works are the poems “The Chambered Nautilus” (1858) and “The Deacon's Masterpiece, or ‘The Wonderful One-Hoss Shay' (1858), often seen as an attack on Calvinism, and the psychological novel Elsie Venner (1861), also an attack on Calvinism that aroused controversy.



Individual Notes

Note for:   Stephen Sewall,   24 MAR 1733/34 - 23 JUL 1804         Index

Individual Note:
     He was a student Cambridge, MA, 1761. School: Harvard College. Stephen's occupation: Professor Cambridge, MA, 1764. Hancock Professor of Hebrew and Other Oriental Languages at Harvard College from 1764-1785.

Individual Notes

Note for:   William Sewall,   17 JAN 1797 -          Index

Individual Note:
     Born January 17, 1797, at Augusta, Me. Besides the common schools at home, he attended the Lincoln County Academy at New Castle, Me. He studied under a private teacher all the time he had when not writing in the office. He was a close student and improved his time to good advantage. He was a successful teacher of a good sized common school in the vicinity of Augusta before he was clerk for Quartermaster General Hamilton, U. S. Army at Boston, Mass. and wherever that business required his attention. After leaving school he wrote for some time in the office of his father who was clerk in the District Court of Maine. When about twenty years old he was clerk in the office of Gen. Hamilton, quartermaster general of the U. S. Army in Boston. Dr. Thomas Sewall of Washington, D. C., a double cousin, secured a clerkship for William Sewall in Washington, D. C. The latter started for Washington on board the ship Alonzo. The ship was wrecked in a severe storm, January 1820, and though none on board lost their lives, all experienced intense suffering. The wind carried the vessel to Smithtown on Long Island where the passengers were taken by land to New York City. William Sewall’s hands were so injured by exposure in working the ship’s pumps that he could no longer write a legible hand. He therefore did not proceed to the clerkship in Washington, but went to Charles county, Maryland, where he taught school one year.

Here he married Eliza Ward Adams, widow of Wm. Adams of Miners Park, Md. She was the daughter of Samuel W. Middleton and Catherine Taliaferro Hooe Middleton, both of Charles county. They were married August 9, 1821, by Rev. Mr. McCormick, an Episcopal minister, at Queen’s Hotel in Washington, D. C. At the wedding were present Dr. Thomas Sewall’s family and the Misses Mary and Emelyn Webster (also relatives). Miss Mary Webster was bridesmaid and Horatio Ward[9] was groomsman.

William Sewall lived in Virginia and West Virginia about nine years, teaching school during that time. In the fall of 1829. his family drove across country to Jacksonville, Ill., William Sewall following February 7, 1830[10]. On March 8[11], he opened a school in the old historic school house that stood southeast of the present public square of Jacksonville. Judge Thomas was the first teacher in this school; Wm. Sewall was the second. He taught here two years or more.

October 1830 he entered a tract of land in Cass county and hired men to cultivate it while he continued to teach. July 19, 1830, with the assistance of others, he organized the first Sunday school in Cass county, at the home of Mrs. Stewart under the bluffwest of his farm. He was for ten years elder of the Panther Creek Presbyterian church in Cass county. April 4, 1833, he moved with his family to his Cass county farm where he lived till his death, April 7, 1846, [aged 49 years, 3 months and 21 days]. Mrs. Sewall died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. H. Goodell, Chandlerville, 111., October 5, 1874, [aged 79 years, 2 months and 8 days].


Individual Notes

Note for:   Richmond Martin Bullock,   3 JAN 1809 - 1883         Index

Individual Note:
     President of Putnam Savings Bank
Served as Connecticut State Senator

Individual Notes

Note for:   Israel Bullock,   18 DEC 1780 - 3 FEB 1814         Index

Individual Note:
     His motto,
The flow of riches thou desired
Life's real goods if well acquired
Unjustly let me never gain
Lest vengeance follow in their train

Individual Notes

Note for:   Mary Martin,   9 FEB 1781 - 4 OCT 1866         Index

Individual Note:
     Buried in Bullock Lt North Burial Ground, Providence, RI

Individual Notes

Note for:   Jabez Bullock,   19 APR 1741 - 3 MAY 1808         Index

Individual Note:
     From genealogical notes of Christine Bullock: "Jabez Bullock - Family History. A branch of the Bullock family settled on the eastern shore of Narragansett Bay. This land and the adjoining water were named for the family Bullock' Point and Bullock's Cove. A part of Bullock's Point has since become a shore resort called Crescent Park, and the hotel was said to be the original residence, altered. Jabez who owned all the land at Bullock's Point was a ship builder and a very rich man, owning large business interests in providence, R.I. All of his immediate descendants were identified with the ship building trade of old Providence. They traded with China."

Individual Notes

Note for:   Anne Bullock,   1777 - 29 JAN 1864         Index

Alias:   /Anna/


Individual Notes

Note for:   Martin Page,    -          Index

Individual Note:
     He was an East India Captain

Individual Notes

Note for:   Ann Martin Bowen,    -          Index

Individual Note:
     Adopted by Anne Bullock and Sylvanius Martin. Anne Bowen was their Neice.