Individual Notes

Note for:   Milton Travis Jennings,   16 JUL 1921 - 12 FEB 1988         Index

Burial:   
     Place:   Murray Salt Lake Utah

Individual Note:
     [441.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Henry Dalton Jennings,   25 MAR 1923 - 2000         Index

Individual Note:
     [441.ged]

Line 306 from GEDCOM File not recognizable or too long:
     RESN Privacy

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

Individual Notes

Note for:   David Lyle Naylor,   10 MAR 1943 - 1 OCT 1995         Index

Individual Note:
     [441.ged]

Sealing to Parents:
30 OCT 2001 AZO
Boyd E. Naylor /

Individual Notes

Note for:   Eleanor Patience Pierce,   7 APR 1868 - 28 FEB 1949         Index

Individual Note:
     [441.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Minnie Chloe Dalton,   27 SEP 1895 - 18 SEP 1965         Index

Burial:   
     Place:   City Cem Provo Utah Ut

Individual Note:
     [441.ged]

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Henry Ingalls,   12 OCT 1738 - 1813         Index

Burial:   
     Date:   1813

Individual Note:
     [441.ged]

Source includes, but is not limited to:
Ancestral File and the IGI, International Genealogical Index,both
resource systems developed and solely owned by The Church of JesusChrist of
Latter Day Saints (JFN).

Individual Notes

Note for:   Sibel Carpenter,   26 FEB 1739/40 -          Index

Individual Note:
     [441.ged]

Source includes, but is not limited to:
Ancestral File and the IGI, International Genealogical Index,both
resource systems developed and solely owned by The Church of JesusChrist of
Latter Day Saints.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Mehetabel Ingalls,   21 JUL 1764 - APR 1821         Index

Burial:   
     Date:   1821

Individual Note:
     [441.ged]

She bore 7 children. Also born 24 JUL.
Source includes, but is not limited to:
Ancestral File and the IGI, International Genealogical Index,both
resource systems developed and solely owned by The Church of JesusChrist of
Latter Day Saints (JFN).

Individual Notes

Note for:   Elizabeth Eliza Ballou,   21 SEP 1801 - 21 JAN 1888         Index

Burial:   
     Date:   JAN 1888

Individual Note:
     [441.ged]

Source includes, but is not limited to:
Ancestral File and the IGI, International Genealogical Index,both
resource systems developed and solely owned by The Church of JesusChrist of
Latter Day Saints.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Abram Garfield,   28 DEC 1799 - 8 MAR 1833         Index

Burial:   
     Date:   MAR 1833

Individual Note:
     [441.ged]

Source includes, but is not limited to:
Ancestral File and the IGI, International Genealogical Index,both
resource systems developed and solely owned by The Church of JesusChrist of
Latter Day Saints.(JFN)

Individual Notes

Note for:   James Abram Garfield,   19 NOV 1831 - 19 SEP 1881         Index

Burial:   
     Date:   SEP 1881

Individual Note:
     [441.ged]

President Garfield was assassinated while in office. He wassucceeded by
Chester A Arthur, a distant cousin (it turns out).(JFN,1980)

20th president of the United States (1881), who during his brief termasserted
presidential prerogatives against the demands of congressionalleaders.

James Abram Garfield was born in a log cabin in Cuyahoga County, Ohio,on
November 19, 1831. Raised in poverty by his widowed mother, and doingevery
kind of rough frontier work, he managed to secure a college educationand to
develop oratorical skills that quickly led him from lay preaching forthe
Disciples of Christ into politics.

    He married Lucretia Rudolph (1832-1918) in 1858 and was elected tothe Ohio
Legislature the year after. When the American Civil War came, heraised a Ohio
Regiment of the Grand Army of the Republic, and soon displayedconsiderable
talent as an administrator and military leader.

In January 1862, when Union victories were rare, Garfield's troopsdefeated a
Confederate army at Middle Creek, making Garfield a hero and resultingin his
promotion to Brigadier General of volunteers. Military glory and his
antislavery record won him a seat in Congress in 1863. Garfield wentto
Washington with brilliant prospects marred only by his lack of wealthand his
tendency, already manifest, to participate in rather dubious business
undertakings that traded on his military fame and political position.

Garfield was a talented parliamentarian, a hard worker, and a skilled
negotiator in Congress. His work on the House Appropriations Committeemade a
real contribution to improving the management of the United Statesgovernment.
When James G Blaine advanced to the Senate in 1876, Garfield succeededhim as
leader of the House Republicans; as such he was a brilliant debaterand a
consistent but sensible partisan. In 1880, when Republican factionsdeadlocked
at the national convention, he was an obvious compromise choice forthe
party's Presidential nomination.

Factional battling within the Republican party marked the 1880campaign, which
was further marred by the airing of two financial scandals thatloosely
implicated Garfield; one involving the paving of Washington, Districtof
Columbia, streets and the other, the building of the transcontinental
railroads. Then, as throughout his career, Garfield deflected hisaccusers,
but he could never fully deter them. With the Republican factionsfinally
cooperating and a New Yorker, Chester A Arthur, as hisVice-Presidential
candidate, Garfield became President with a scant margin of 10,000votes.

Garfield's brief administration was consumed largely by a war withSenator
Roscoe Conkling of New York over patronage. Garfield had appointedJames
Blaine, Conkling's greatest enemy, as Secretary of State and thennamed a
Blaine supporter to the politically critical position of Collector ofthe Port
of New York.

Conkling, upholding the tradition of Senatorial courtesy, questionedthe
President's right to make New York appointments over the objection ofthe
state's Senator. After a bitter battle in which it became clear thatthe
Senate would confirm Garfield's nominee, Conkling and Thomas Platt
(1833-1910), New York's junior senator, resigned their seats, seeking
vindication through reelection by the New York legislature. Conkling'splan
backfired: The legislature sent two new senators to Washington, ending
Conkling's career and giving Garfield a triumph.

On 02 JUL 1881, Charles Jules Guiteau (circa 1840-82), a disappointedoffice
seeker, shot President Garfield; he lingered on until 19 September,when he
finally succumbed. Garfield's death at the hands of a frustratedoffice seeker
created a powerful impetus for civil reform. His administration, which
initiated prosecutions for mail-contract frauds in the previous
administration, in addition to fighting the battles with Conkling, had
importance principally in asserting the power of the President against
Congress and in attacking corruption in government.

Principal text author; Hon. Robert D Marcus

    US President James A. Garfield and Val John Jennings are 4th cousins 4 times removed. Thei r common ancestors are Jotham CARPENTER and Desire Martin.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Lucretia Rudolph,    - 13 MAR 1918         Index

Burial:   
     Date:   MAR 1918